The GMAT Integrated Reasoning Section

  • Time: 30 minutes
  • Format: 12 questions, some with multiple parts
  • Tests ability to solve complex problems using data from multiple sources

Integrated Reasoning questions are designed to resemble problems you will encounter in business school and in your career. The Integrated Reasoning section is the only section of the GMAT that gives you access to an onscreen calculator —but don't be tempted to over-rely on the calculator; IR questions are designed to test complex reasoning far more than simple computation.

Your IR score does not count toward your 200–800 total score. You receive a separate IR score from 1 to 8. The Integrated Reasoning section consists of four different question types:

Graphics Interpretation

This question type tests your ability to use visual data (presented in graphs, diagrams, or other visual formats). Look at the answer choices when deciding your approach, but don’t let them distract you—as in the Quantitative section, there are sure to be wrong answer traps for test takers who misinterpret the graphs.

Multi-Source Reasoning

This question type tests your ability to synthesize multiple sources of data (2–3 tabbed pages containing text, charts, or tables). To tackle these questions, create a brief outline of the main points on your noteboard (as you would for a Reading Comprehension passage) and return to the tabs to research the details needed to answer individual questions.

Table Analysis

This question type tests your ability to interpret data in spreadsheets. Use the sort function as needed to visualize trends in the data.

Two-Part Analysis

This question type tests your ability to answer questions that contain two separate components that must work together in the given scenario. These questions can require both quantitative and verbal skills. Double-check that you do not mix up the two columns when selecting your answers.