Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions

Children Who Can Read, But Don't
How Can Parents Encourage Kids to Read
10 Options For Reading Outside the Book
Tips for Reading Aloud with Teens and Preteens
 

How to Lead Reluctant Readers Aged 9-13 Back to Books
Studies show what common sense tells us: the more kids read, the better they read and the more pleasure they get out of reading.

Unfortunately, the reverse also holds true: children who read very little usually have poor reading skills. Reading is a struggle for them, and they avoid it whenever possible.

Is there anything that you can do to encourage your children to read? First, it's helpful to know your child's reasons for not liking or wanting to read. These reasons can help you decide what will work best in motivating your child to discover or rediscover how much fun reading can be.

Why Some Kids Don't Like to Read
Do any of these statements have a familiar ring? They are the reasons children frequently give for not reading:

If you or someone else in your family has had problems reading, there is a greater likelihood that your children will experience these difficulties, too. Speak to a reading teacher if you have reason to suspect a learning problem. Early testing administered at your child's school can identify a learning disability and alert the school to your child's need for special teaching.

What Won't Work
Parents have told us that the following tactics only strengthen a child's resistance to reading:

If your differences are simply a matter of personal taste, respect your child's right to his or her own preferences.

Making a big deal about reading. Don't turn reading into a campaign. Under pressure, children may read only to please their parents rather than themselves, or they may turn around and refuse to read altogether.

Related articles:
How Can Parents Encourage Kids to Read
10 Options For Reading Outside the Book
Tips for Reading Aloud with Teens and Preteens (Family Literacy)