Kaplan Test Prep’s 2012 Survey of Medical School Admissions Officers

According to Kaplan Test Prep’s 2012 survey of medical  school admissions officers at 75 of the 140+ Association of American Medical Colleges-accredited schools across the United States – including many of the top ranked – the vastly revamped MCAT set to launch in 2015 has strong support. Nearly 9 out of 10 (87%) medical school admissions officers support the changes to the MCAT, while only 1% don’t support the changes; 12% aren’t sure.   Similarly, 74% of admissions officers say the 2015 MCAT will better prepare aspiring doctors for medical school; just 5% say it won’t; and 21% aren’t sure of what its effects will mean. For more complete results in PDF format, click here.  Below are some key findings:

Which would you say is the most important factor in the medical school application process?

  • MCAT score: 51%
  • Undergraduate GPA: 23%
  • Relevant experience: 14%
  • Interview: 6%
  • Letters of recommendation: 4%
  • Personal statement: 3%

Based on what you know about the new MCAT, do you support the approved changes?

  • Completely yes: 41%
  • Generally yes: 46%
  • Generally no: 1%
  • Completely no: 0%
  • Not sure: 12% (22%)

In order to sufficiently prepare students for the new MCAT, do pre-med programs need to revise their curricula ?

  • Yes: 47% (67%)
  • No: 30% (5%)
  • Not sure: 22% (29%)

How do you think changes to the MCAT will affect the course load for pre-med students?

  • It will increase the courseload: 40%
  • It will decrease the courseload: 0%
  • The courseload will stay about the same: 46%
  • Not sure: 15%

Do you think the changes to the test will better prepare students for medical school?

  • Yes: 74%
  • No: 5%
  • Not sure: 21%