ACT Score Predictor: What is your ACT score?

ACT Score Predictor: What is your ACT Score?

Find out your ACT score in under 15 minutes with a quick 12-question quiz. Do you have a competitive ACT score? An elite ACT score? or just a beginner ACT score? We’ve drawn questions from all topics of the ACT, including English, Science, Math and Reading skills.

The ACT is very predictable. You’d think the test makers would get bored after a while, but they don’t. The same kinds of questions, testing the same skills and concepts, appear every time the ACT is given. The exception to this rule is the optional Writing test. But don’t worry: we’ve got articles that will help you master this portion of the exam should you decide to take it.

Because the test specifications rarely change, you should know in advance what to expect on every subject test. Just a little familiarity with the directions and common question types can make an enormous difference.

What does your ACT Score mean?

Your ACT score is not merely the sum total of questions you get right. That would be too simple. Instead, the test makers add up all of your correct answers to get what they call a “raw” score. Then they put that raw score into a very large computer, which proceeds to shake, rattle, smoke, and wheeze before spitting out an official score at the other end. That score—which has been put through what they call a scoring formula—is your “scaled” score.

ACT scaled scores range from 1 to 36. Nearly half of all test takers score within a much narrower range: 17 to 23. Tests at different dates vary slightly, but the following data are based on a recent administration of the test and can be considered typical:

Percentage of ACT takers scoring at or below given score from www. actstudent.org.
Percentile RankScaled (or Composite) ScoreApproximate Percentage Correct
99th3393%
84th2675%
69th2363%
55th2153%
27th1743%

 

To earn a score of 21 (the 2010 national average), you need to answer only about 53 percent of the questions correctly. On most tests, getting only a bit more than half the questions right would be terrible. Not so on the ACT. That fact alone should ease some of your anxiety about how hard this test is. You can miss several ACT questions and still get a good score. Nobody expects you to get all of the questions right.