good bad average LSAT scores

What’s a good LSAT score?

What LSAT score do you need? As you consider an LSAT score goal in 2017’s competitive admissions cycle , it’s always wise to look at average scores at the schools to which you’re applying. For starters, though, here are the basics you might need to know about your LSAT score:

The LSAT is scored on a 120-180 scale. The average LSAT score is about a 151. This relatively small range of scores means that small improvements in performance can increase your score quite a bit. It also means that small improvements in your score can make a big difference in your percentile ranking (sometimes, a one point increase in your score can boost your percentile ranking by as many as 5 points).

 

LSAT Score Ranges

BEST SCORES

Top LSAT Scores

Scores that will put you in the top 10% of all test takers

SCALED SCORE: 164-180

BETTER SCORES

Competitive LSAT Scores

These scores will put you in a highly competitive place in admissions (top 25% of all test takers)

SCALED SCORE: 159-163

GOOD SCORES

Good Enough LSAT Scores

These scores put you ahead of the pack (50%+), but won’t be as advantageous when applying to highly competitive programs

SCALED SCORE: 152-158

BELOW AVERAGE SCORES

Below Average LSAT Scores

These scores may be enough to get into a wide variety of law schools, but will be below average compared to the testing population

SCALED SCORE: 151 or below

How is the LSAT scored?

The test-taking world would be such an easier place to understand if every test was scored on a 1-100 scale. However, the LSAT is on a scale that ranges from 120- the lowest score possible- to 180- a perfect score.

The scoring on the LSAT might seem strange because there are not, in fact, 180 questions on the test. Thus, getting one wrong answer does not equate to one lost point in your overall score. Rather, your raw score, the number you get correct out of the roughly 100-101 questions on the test, is converted into a 120-180 score based on a mathematical formula specific to that particular test. This method, with different conversions formulas for each LSAT, is designed to minimize the variance in scores across the four LSAT administered each year, and across LSATs over different years.

On average, getting a raw score of 87 (out of 101) or above converts into an LSAT score of 170 or above. Note that a score in this range places you, on average, in the 98th percentile, meaning that only 2% of all those who take the LSAT score a 170 or above. To get a score in the 160s you should aim for getting 70-85 of the questions correct, or around 70%. A score in the 160’s will place you in roughly the 80th percentile.

While this scoring may seem complex at first, after you gain familiarity with the LSAT it will start to make more sense. For information on what the average LSAT scores are for students attending a particular law school you can visit that law schools website, or see a list of average scores here.

How is your LSAT score considered for law school admissions?

Your LSAT score is a crucial factor in determining where you go to law school—or if you go at all. Law school admission committees look at your LSAT score to determine if you have the skills required for success in law school. It helps admissions officers compare your record with those of students from other schools.

Most law schools use an “index formula” — a weighting of your LSAT score and undergraduate cumulative GPA to determine your application’s objective strength. Almost universally, the LSAT score has a greater weight than your undergraduate GPA, accounting for more than 50% of the admissions decision.

Keep in mind that while Law School Admissions officers often rank LSAT as the number one factor in law school admissions, your LSAT score does not stand alone. Whether or not you are admitted to law school depends on like GPA, recommendations and personal statement. In addition to focusing on getting the best LSAT score possible, you should also work on obtaining the best GPA possible, writing a spectacular personal statement, flattering professors and professionals into writing outstanding letters of recommendation, and rounding out your resume.

 

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