renaissance school of medicine at stony brook university

Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University Requirements, Tuition, and More

We’re covering everything you need to know as you consider applying to the Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University. You’ll learn about admittance rates, application deadlines, average MCAT scores, tuition, curriculum, and more.

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All About the Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University

Founded in 1971, the Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University is known for contributing to major medical innovations including the development of the MRI, PET scan, 3D virtual colonoscopy, and the discovery of the etiology of Lyme disease. 

Admission to Renaissance is highly competitive. The institution only accepts 7 percent of the more than 5,000 applications it receives every year. Currently, the institution has over 500 full-time students and 904 full-time faculty.

Renaissance receives over $90 million research funding annually and runs National Institutes of Health (NIH) sponsored research programs in neurological diseases, cancer, cardiovascular disorders, and more. This research has yielded a number of groundbreaking medical discoveries including the development of medications like ReoPro, Periostat, and Xiaflex. The school maintains partnerships with seven hospitals including Stony Brook University Hospital, Northport VA Medical Center, and NYU Winthrop Hospital.

In addition to offering a traditional MD program, the school also offers a number of dual-degree programs in conjunction with other schools at Stony Brook University. These include an MD-MPH, an MD-MBA, and an MD-MA in conjunction with the Center for Bioethics, Compassionate Care and Medical Humanities. Tuition at Renaissance is $43,670 for in-state residents and $66,160 for out-of-state residents. Financial aid is available to students with a demonstrated need.

Students interested in a deep and rich student-life experience will be pleased to find out that Renaissance boasts more than 70 student clubs and interest groups in medicine, music, film, art, and others. Those interested in athletics are encouraged to expand their social network by participating in Stony Brook’s campus-wide intramural sports offerings. Renaissance also hosts a variety of social and cultural events including potlucks, formals, Jeopardy sessions, Hispanic and Asian heritage nights, and more. 

Introduced in 2014, Renaissance’s LEARN curriculum was redesigned to increase active learning, establish early professional identity, and develop physician competencies in an integrated and contextual approach. The curriculum emphasizes active student learning, self-direction, collaboration between students and professors, and earlier introduction to clinical clerkships.

The Curriculum at the Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University

Renaissance’s LEARN curriculum—an acronym for Learning-Centered, Experiential, Adaptive, Rigorous, and Novel—trains students through a three-phase approach:

  • An 18-month foundational phase
  • A one-year primary clinical phase
  • A 16-month advanced clinical phase

The curriculum is augmented by transition courses—which introduce each phase of the curriculum—optional scholarly concentration programs, and five distinct tracks of study. These five tracks include Basic, Clinical or Translational Research; Global Health; Social Sciences; Medical Humanities and Ethics; and Medical Education. Students spend six months immersed in their areas of scholarly activity; following this, they conduct a research study and present their work at Research Day in their fourth year.

The MD curriculum consists of three phases:

Phase I: Foundational – begins with an eight-day transitional course and is followed by 18 months of course work in biomedicine, pathology systems, and three longitudinal courses in clinical medicine, medical education, and medicine in contemporary society. 

Phase II: Primary Clinical – begins with a two-week transition course followed by primary clinical clerkships, which are aligned in four 12-week blocks. Each block culminates in a one-week Transitional Pillar. 

Phase III: Advanced Clinical – consists of four four-week blocks: a sub-internship, an individualized advanced clinical experience, a transition to residency course, and a selective. 24 weeks of elective courses follow.

In addition to the MD track, Renaissance offers the following dual-degree programs:

MD/ MPH – the 54-credit, five-year combined MD/Master of Public Health program is ideal for students interested in community and international health.

MD/PhD Program – the Medical Scientist Training Program takes students 50 miles outside of Manhattan and places them in the Brookhaven National Laboratory and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Here, they train for careers in research and pedagogy.

MD/MBA – this 48-credit program prepares students for management careers in the healthcare field.

MD/MA – this program admits up to two medical students each year. Students complete coursework in medical humanities, compassionate care, and bioethics.

Scholars in Medicine – is an integrated eight-year BA/MD course of study offered to exceptional high school students.

How has the Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University Made an Impact?

Renaissance clinical researchers have been behind numerous medical breakthroughs:

  • Developed Nobel Prize-winning technology that led to the MRI
  • Created the first MRI image of a living organism
  • Created a new ultrasound method that speeds the healing of bone fractures
  • Discovered the link between emphysema and smoking
  • Created the drug that is recommended for all cardiac angioplasties
  • Assisted in developing technology for PET scans
  • Pioneered technology for the 3D colonoscopy
  • Discovered the cause of Lyme disease
  • Created new medications including ReoPro, Periostate, and Xiaflex

Notable Programs at the Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University

Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University: Enrollment, Admittance, Tuition, and more

Renaissance has over 500 full-time students. In 2018, 136 students enrolled out of 4,816 applicants. The cumulative GPA was 3.8 percent and the average MCAT score was in the 90th percentile. Of these students, 60 percent were New York State residents and 26 percent were from a lower socioeconomic background, according to the school.

What is the enrollment rate for the Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University?

The enrollment rate is 2.8%.

How expensive is tuition at the Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University?

Tuition at Renaissance is $43,670 for in-state residents and $66,160 for out-of-state residents. Financial aid is available to students with a demonstrated need.

When is the application deadline for the Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University?

Here is the application cycle:

  • Early June: AMCAS application becomes available
  • August 1: AMCAS application deadline for early decision
  • September: Interviews begin
  • October 1: Early decision applicants notified
  • December 1: AMCAS application deadline for all other applicants
  • December 27: Deadline for supplemental application and letters of recommendation
  • Mid-March: Interviews conclude

The application fee is $100. Renaissance School of Medicine recruits on a rolling basis, and also has an Early Decision program.

Median MCAT Scores for the Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University

The incoming class in 2018 had an average GPA of 3.8 and a 90th percentile MCAT score.

Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University – Residency Program Match Rates and Locations

The most popular residency and programs that members of the Class of 2017 and 2018 matched into were in the following specialties:

  • Anesthesiology
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Internal Medicine
  • Neurology
  • Orthopedic Surgery
  • Pediatrics
  • Psychiatry
  • Radiology – Diagnostic
  • Surgery – General
  • Urology